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Synopsis

A Stargazers Guide to the Cosmos takes us on the ultimate journey of discovery through the wonders of the southern night sky. Navigating this fantastic voyage is outback astronomer, Greg Quicke (aka Space Gandalf) The ex-pearl diver, cattleman, microbiologist and truck driver calls on his own galaxy of life experiences to reveal the secrets of our solar system, drawing remarkable connections between the everyday world we take for granted and the night sky above us. Over 10 inspiring short films, Greg reveals an odyssey of stellar spectacles: From how one tiny quirk of our planets orbit, makes the life-giving cycle of the seasons possible, to helping spot the International Space Station with the naked eye. Using simple tools, Greg blends his unique mix of profound and profoundly practical astronomy, to help us experience a series of powerful ‘penny drop’ moments, as we forge our own lasting connection with the night sky.

Photo credit Danni Booth

Production Information

Director

Jordan Edmeades

Supervising Director

Nicholas Powell

Producers

Roger Power

Executive Producers

Dan Brown

Jacqueline Willinge

Anthony Willinge

Director of Photography

Thomas David

Editor

Ivan Davidov

Key Locations

Broome

Lurujarri Heritage Trail

Cable Beach

James Price Point

Filming in Broome

“I always jump at the chance to shoot in Western Australia”

The rich red dirt in contrast with lush greens is uniquely Australian and translates so beautifully onto our screens. After a WA shoot, the red dirt embedded on my film cases always triggers fond memories of the people and locations from the shoots long after I return.

– Thomas David, Director of Photography

Photo credit Jordan Edemandes
Tom David preparing to film Greg on his old Harley
Photo credit Danni Booth
Greg Quicke at James Price Point

Space Gandalf

“It’s just about figuring out how things work”

If you simply watch you can figure anything out for yourself. You can find the planets. You can watch their progression through the stars and through the sky. Becoming familiar with the stars and constellations is easier if you have someone to point them out. Once you get started though and begin to recognise the journey we are all on through space on this little planet of ours, tuning in becomes a natural part of your life. I get to watch people light up to this all the time. That’s my joy.’

– Greg Quicke, Astronomer

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